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20130228
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. joining us in our panel today are tami bahr, assistant director, connections counseling, board member of recovery foundation, madison, wisconsin; jonathan katz, director, rita j. kaplan jewish community services, jewish board of family and children services, new york, new york; justin riley, at-large board member, faces and voices of recovery, seattle, washington; bridget ruiz, technical expert lead, division of systems improvement, jbs international, bethesda, maryland. bridget, 21.5 percent of 18- to 25-year-olds have an issue with illicit drugs. talk to me a little bit about that and what kind of drugs are they using. it is quite different than it was even 2 or 3 years ago. we see a huge increase in pharmaceutical drug use, not using it as prescribed. we also see an increase in alcohol use, and binge drinking is a serious problem, as well as some of the more legal types of drugs labeled as incense or those types of things in different smoke shops. and jonathan, does that hold true for what you are seeing in new york city? absolutely. we are seeing the use or the misuse of drugs suc
everyone to provide excellent service for people who use wheelchairs. but i'm just worried about this legislation in particular, pretty specific to how if you look at the section 1110 subsection d, it doesn't really refer to a record of service to passengers in wheelchairs. i'm worried about limiting in terms of our ability to create a path for other companies that maybe aren't currently providing service to people in wheelchairs but would like to. >> yeah, i think it was a point well taken. i think it was mr. gruberg who made the comment on behalf of green cab. the intent was absolutely to look at the performance of the cab companies and to send the ability to provide the service to those who have a demonstrated performance in doing so. so, the legislation does specify that as a way to do that. i don't think it precludes the consideration of other factors. and it's something that i don't know that we had contemplated so much, but we can certainly explore how we would deal with the situation where a cab company that has no performance history might be able to access the program a
to know how to use it. ♪ ♪ >> divisional divide is a divide between those with access to use digital tools and those who don't. >> with young people, having computers and i just don't know. they're doing it fast. so, i want to know. >> not knowing how to navigate the internet or at a loss of what to do. >> we don't have a computer. >> we're a nonprofit that unites organizations and volunteers to transform lies through literacy. our big problem right now is the broadband opportunity program. a federally funded project through the department of aging. so, we're working in 26 locations. our volunteers are trained to be tutors and trainers, offering everything from basic classes all the way to genealogy and job search. >> to me computers, knowing how to use it. >> i think it's really important to everybody and possibly especially seniors to get enough of these skills to stay in touch. >> it's been fun. with seniors, to get them out of their homes. >> so they can connect with their family members. or their family members. >> [speaking in spanish]. >> so, what we focus on is transferring s
you a very happy new year [speaking foreign language] please join us for refreshments. >> san francisco is home to some of the most innovative companies of the 21st century. this pioneering and forward looking spirit is alive in san francisco government as well. the new headquarters of the san francisco public utilities commission at a5 25 golden gate avenue is more than just a 13-story building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitab
to shut this off. we use it for cooking, eating and hot water. there were 40,000 people that called pg and e about their gas. that means they call turned off their gas? did they need to do that? when do you have to? when there is a problem. how long did you think it takes pg and e to get out and turn it back on? 45,000 people. days weeks, may be a month. who has seen this in the streets. a lot of muck is in there is it's full of dirt and weeds you turn it to the right to tighten it and left to loosen it. your home work you have to look at your house, pop open the lid, look in there see what's going on in there it's not nice and clean like this. who has seen this around their house? everybody. each meter has a shut off. you want to find out where your gas meter is. you can keep track of your usage but you will know how to shut it off. here's the shut off. i have some tools up here, you can look at these. any hardware store has these. they fit on this and it allows you to turn off the gas. when we talk about the wheels it's these on top. if you have a broken pipe. they will spin like mad
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
participant in their experiment to use the residents in the area as a control group, and i don't quite understand how -- lastly i don't understand how this was able to slip through. we received -- residents in my area -- at least the neighbors that i asked we received one notification and that was a month ago and that was for this and we heard nothing else. thank you. >> hi. my name is mark dennis and i am opposed to the installation of these antennas. basically the sections that they have moved to have the them under with the planning code it requires there is the necessity like people have mentioned and i don't believe at&t can show that necessity. i know people in the area that have at&t and they have no problems with the coverage. the representative from at&t brings up the public transportation lines there. that really seems like a last -- oh we have nothing to grab at kind of argument. oh let's bring up public transportation. every carrier -- cell phone carrier you can always make engineer -- emergency calls and to bring that up it means they don't believe their own argument.
, and important to those of us who support a station in north beach, that is the majority of my neighbors in my opinion, it preserve the section of tunnel that's currently planned in phase ii that runs from chinatown to north beach. it's already paid for. it's a done deal. and it allows that section of tunnel to be built. and we hope to facilitate the eventual construction of a north beach station. this item allows you to support the efforts of our supervisor who has tried very hard to be responsive to the concerns of his constituents. and i hope that this item will help jump start the discussion of an eventual north beach and potentially fisherman's wharf station. i think the central subway doesn't make sense without those and i think our neighborhood needs them to continue to grow and survive in the future. so, give us a hand, if you would. let this roll forward. and i hope we're talking about a north beach station before too much longer. thank you, commissioners. >> is there any additional or further public comment? okay, seeing none, public comment is closed. commissioners? commissioner ant
] correct it for lots along the way. i understand people say it could be specialty use. we have these situations all the time. we approved philanthropic uses which applies to certain lots because the project sponsor we had earlier in sacramento street was also specific more to a lot we were able to expand it. something that might be easier to consider to look at this more broadly if the legal asian of existing off-site kitchens, having a process or pass maybe city-wide for that. i imagine there are a lot of illegal off-site kitchens. the issue around food trucks, i have a restaurant right on the corner from where i live that also has a food truck. i see the food going back and forth. i know other [speaker not understood] don't have brick and mortar restaurants. they're [speaker not understood], one first step just might be legalization of an existing off-site restaurant and ncts throughout the city could be step one. and then step two, looking at -- because obviously most people are fine with the status quo. the issue is we don't know if we do a new balance, creating kitchens al
, they see our work process, our discussions, the decisions we make. it is good for us. we kind of behavior little bit when we have people in the audience. msk (music) >> we are rehearsing for our most expensive tour; plus two concerts here. we are proud that the growth of the orchestra, and how it is expanded and it is being accepted. my ambition when i came on as music director here -- it was evident we needed absolutely excellent work. also evident to me that i thought everyone should know that. this was my purpose. and after we opened, which was a spectacular opening concert about five weeks after that the economy completely crashed. my plan -- and i'm absolutely dogmatic about my plans --were delayed slightly. i would say that in this very difficult timefor the arts and everyone, especially the arts, it's phenomenal how new century has grown where many unfortunate organizations have stopped. during this period we got ourselves on national radio presence; we started touring, releasing cds, a dvd. we continue to tour. reputation grows and grows and grows and it has never stopped going f
are local and jobs are local. each of us each day can fix the neighborhood. real progress is credit place specific and - this concreteness is one of the benefits of college track. it lift up one student after another it looks after and supports individuals. it stands or falls on the local individual concrete attention. there is nothing global about it's on the difference even though we believe that other institutions like ours with help the world. slowly we partially we build out. we're great deal of that mayor lee has chosen to make his first state of the city address here. it sends a message for all student in san francisco. you know that this city's future don't understand on the education we provide for all our children. it's with great pleurisy introduce the mayor of the city of san francisco. good morning thank you laura republican for that kind introduction and thank you for opening your divorces to me this morning. i want to honor david and all your supervisors and to our two newest supervisors. mayor brown thank you for being here and taking the time to join us this morning. you
need the microphone. i feel like oprah. now you don't have to use it any more. >> i was just wondering if you had done your own [speaker not understood] the commission. but then you've been [speaker not understood]. >> no, i can't even do half the stuff they do. i actually tried in my backyard. i was doing some christmas project and i'm like, i'm going to try this. i'm like, i can't do it. it's all the pressure nozzle and all that stuff. no, i haven't done it on my own. and i wouldn't post anybody else's either. >> but that's why i wondered if you even got someone you knew, an artist. [speaker not understood]. >> we do have a guy. his name is ted walker. he is a published artist and he actually does that for us. so, we use that because then we can legally say we used our own person. >> do you have more than one person who will friend a person, like someone you're looking into so they don't get suspicion us? >> oh, yeah. >> [speaker not understood] was saying, don't [speaker not understood]. >> you're exactly right. once you start friending about 10 people -- because, again, don't do mo
. the question in conditional use how do you determine who is a good project sponsor? >>: our process is not comfortable. is long and expensive. by the end of it we know who the operators are. to the uncomfortable process a relationship is formed. this is not a huge bureaucracy that we are dealing with. four people. if somebody walks in and we know, oh, that's that guy who runs that place we say so. >> commissioner borden: is there a basis on which you cannot issue a permit? >>: spelled out. this goes back to the first-- our permits are "shall grant", you shall grant if abc -- our processor design for compliance, not designed to keep people out or punish people. it frustrates the heck out of sfpd and neighbors. >> commissioner borden: the question that comes up sometime is, if someone wants the permit they go through the process, they can get it and it doesn't matter what their history is barring criminal activity. >>: i would not underestimate the importance of the sfpd entertainment commission informal powers. and the conditions attached to a permit. with specific cases like the
. for us that's not a big deal. there are a lot of murals in sacramento and san francisco that is all permission based. for us, we're kind of a sdae zero tolerance city in sacramento. you go out and you vandalize something, that's a crime. that's how we view that in our city. >> i tell them it's art, you got to express yourself but you cannot damage other people's property. i usually say how many of you have a little brother or sister, you don't want to teach them to steal. how do you feel when they mess up your stuff? that's how i approach it. >> also we try to leave that at the end where tibo, played by anthony over here, that's basically how the character evolves throughout the play, being this leader of this crew and, you know, he kind of teaches everybody but says, yeah, you have a leader but i ain't going to do what you are going to do. robert over here who plays damage, he's the antagonist. he's kind of damaged but at the end, you know, these guys, oh, hey, you know what, you gt a talent, let's turn that into some artistic talent, he's going to go to college to try to imp
with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend bryant. bow your heart with me. a discussion on the importance of interface based leadership on the city's violence prevention initiative predict and organize for a safer san francisco is where we're opening up
and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my mom flew in tonight. my brother, who works for bart. [applause] i have my nephew, who is here tonight. i want him to see me so he can follow my footsteps sunday to give back to the community. with me here are my managers and supervisors. i also have my longtime friend, jamie, who has been here. i see my former boss here. i have been nominated so many times. it really feels like you won an oscar. lastly, i wanted to thank my husband, who has been not just a husband to me, but he has been my chauffeur -- [laughter] mike coy cook, personal photographer, and no. 1 critic. i know i forgot so many people to
started using light green and dark green here. i do not think we're using the same definition that marin uses. we're using -- we're talking about 100% renewable in both the dark green and the light green option. correct? it's just the rec mix that will differentiate the light versus the dark. * >> so, correct. what we've presented were a series of 100% renewable portfolio. >> correct. >> and i think folks fell into the language of how do you describe the sort of premiumness of the green products that makeup that 100%. in order to express the differentiation between a heavily bucket 3 100% renewable program versus a less, a 5% bucket 3 versus an 85% bucket 3. >> which is different from marin, correct? >> very different from marin. >> i agree with the public commenters who said the definition of light and dark green is different than how it's being used here today. >> i don't know if we need different language or what we need to do, but i think that's important to clarify. * >> we need different language. >> yes. >> so whatever it means, whatever our options are that we're talki
torrez to join us again on stage, joaquin will be introducing the mayor and if i can ask my fellow committee members to also join us on stage. joaquin. >> thank you very much i have to say as director the mayor's oches of neighborhood services it's refreshing to have a mayor so dedicated to couldn't and it makes my job easier when our people in the community want to feel our elected efficients make our needs and it's in physical presence and i have had the great pleasure of serving under our mayor lee who i would like to make a invite to make a few remarks in honor or of arab heritage month here in san francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now
objective being the fire itself. those work out for us here and we can go ahead and use those skills forward as well. thank you very much, we appreciate the opportunity. >> thank you, i'd like to thank our panelists and open it up to our group for any questions of our panelists today. yes, sir, secretary. >> there are a lot of things you can do in a forest that tend to make it easier it fight a fire like most importantly burning off the fuel during the wet season so there's less for the fire to feed on. to what extent in cal fire and all your other things do you encourage people to do things in their forest when you don't have a fire that make it easier and more effective in fighting the fire? >> it's an excellent question, sir. we spend a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation management program in cal fire, we have a robust program throughout the state where we are conducting burning operations and vegetation management with prieflt ranch owners and private land own
that helped me with mine and like i said, i'm not an expert, but if i can use -- if you can use something for me to help make your investigation successful, i don't start off with why did you do this, what did you do -- i start off nice and slow. tell me a little bit about yourself. it's like an interview, okay. and they tell you. you find something like jugs didn't have a dad. he said, i didn't have a dad to kick my ass to keep me right. it's okay, man. you try to hit those things and work them that way. mod, same thing. he was addict today it. could not stop. did not want to stop. just kept going. told me that if we didn't stop him, he'd still be writing. but here, 6-1/2 years in prison. so, we sat on that house. we arrested him that day. it was a great day, it was a great time. got him put behind bars. did his fingerprints. guess what? fingerprints came back. i got hits all over phoenix. what the hell is going on? guy is just a tagger, right? no, he did six burglaries in phoenix and five burglaries in glendale by his girlfriend's house. 35 guns stolen. went back and interviewed him. wh
. thank you so much. that was fantastic what you did for us. christopher stevens was obviously an extraordinary human being and contributor. every year at stanford we have a group of what we call national security fellows come. they were roughly army, navy, air force, state department. a couple weeks ago we had a meeting and the first person i called on was an army colonel. i said where were you last? he said in libya. i said did you know christopher stevens? he said everybody knew christopher stevens. he was our leader, fluent in arabic, constructive, positive, doing something, he was our leader. this spontaneous practically eruption from him. he was a foreign service officer. anybody who has served with a foreign service as i did as the secretary of state knows, what a very special group of people this is. they are very able people. dedicated. they work hard for our country. chris was extraordinary and stood out. i thought what image can i think of that might express our way of thinking about him. i thought of the great seal of our republic. i don't know how many of you have
can tell us when we are done what it is. something will repeat 3 times. [applause] okay. which one of you figured it out? yes. >> 49, hum... >> i can see how you would say that, why do you say that? there is 49 of something. okay. did you notice the turns? the spins? how many were there in one piece? yes. no. yes. 9. how many times did we repeat that? how many times? 3. 9 times 3 -- is 27. we did 27 turns but we were going, 1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1. that's a sophisticated math concept, you were not wrong. i bet you will grow up to be a mathematician. i will give you my address you will have to send me your first paycheck because i taught you this. at this point we would like to thank you very much for coming. if you have any questions. i don't know if we want to open it you will for questions. may be just a few? okay. yes. what's your question? >> how do we get in this program? that is a good question. >> it's an interesting question because the answer with the 3 of us is the same. what i want to point out i look like i might be from india when i talk i sound like i'm from america. my
societies, europe and elsewhere, though their rates of nonviolent crime and drug use are not that much different than ours. so if another country were to lock up its own people at the rate that we do, and if our rates of incarceration were more normative to the rest of the world, we would regard with that other country was doing as a massive violation of human rights. that's the way we would look at it. now, the other point here is what we're doing is not even consistent with american history. i mean, we had 500,000 people behind bars in 1980 and now we have 2.3 million, 2.4 million people behind bars and almost have 5,000 people behind bars just for a drug violation. there are as many people behind bars for a drug violation than we had for everything in 1980. it's not consistent with global standards and not consistent with our own history. it's costing a vast amount of money and i think what you see is for some of the d.a.'s and others are beginning to say enough is enough. we're seeing prison populations beginning to decline but when it comes down to the question,
into our passwords. we use our state codes for graffiti. so, ours is like error 13.16-2. if you continuously go on and keep forgetting how to sign up, it's going to lock you out as well. now, i was going to show you guys how to set up one. everybody is scared in here to set up a facebook one. so, i'm going to show you some things that we do. any questions so far? all right. different things that we found on facebook as well with tagers. we had a tager four months ago * that was selling grenades, okay. he described them. he talked about them all on facebook. we got that over to atf and our gun squad and they took care of that issue right away. yeah, they were dummies, but the way he was describing them on the internet. there was a guy from russia that was on there talking about how he wanted them. i mean, it's big. i mean, it's crazy what some of these people do. the other things, too -- the other thing is when you do set up your facebook -- i have to tell but this, too. you can't just set up a facebook account and leave it and friend one person and hope to get more friends to c
grew up in the city and used the parks and now the grandmother of 13 grandchildren, but not one of them lives in san francisco and this is a big part due to the economic conditions of our city, which drive our families out of town. so i am here to talk about how we have to prioritize our city parks. i echo what dennis has just reported on, but the quality of life issues in san francisco and our parks and their healthy maintenance and vitality is what is a true quality of life issue for san franciscans. we need a bigger part of the general fund budget. we need to make sure that even though we have scholarships and ways for poor children, that is not good enough. we need to roll back the fees and we need the kind of environment that children grew up in san francisco, that free access to public parks and that amazing system that we all came to know. there is no reason that we can't do that again, but it takes commitment and other funding options and may require reprioritizing our city's needs and parks are things that do help with public safety, mental illness and all kinds of other woes
enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population of people as felons and p
plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around that and then use the plastic just as the thing that keeps it from leak-proof or if i'm taking soup to work, i have my soup in a glass jar but i will throw it in plastic because i don't want it all over my backpack and there's also more stainless steel options which are a little more expensive but that's a one-time investment, just don't lose it, so a box o
is he spray painted a fire station. and i don't know about you guys have good firemen like us, but our firemen like to kick the crap out of people that do things like that. they've helped me a lot. they actually chased this kid down, got him arrested for the criminal damage on the firehouse, but for some unknown reason we didn't get a call out on it. when i get something like that, i know who he is. i put a file stop on him. for some reason they didn't call me so i didn't get to interview him that day. i had to find them again. once he was released from jail he he was back out tagging again. his tags started moving north and west of our valley. where is he going? so, then, using facebook i found out where his girlfriend was and she lives in glendale. so, they take pictures and it goes on facebook and you do the longitude-latitude and you can get kind of close to where it was. well, just so happened that he tagged at 27th avenue in glendale, right on the glendale and phoenix border, we start today set up on him and found out where his girlfriend lived. we sat on the house and c
and sin no more. and if you do, you'll be back here to see us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, whether or not that program would be positively or adversely affected by senator leno's proposal. >> yes, let me start with the first question concerning juveniles. i think juveniles defini
hope we're going back to blue and this was just a one-time thing. the last time we used yellow for the cover was when the commission sat in 1988 to consider the sales tax plan for transportation and it was a special color that we used just for that occasion because normally we use blue. >> i'm looking forward to red for valentine's day. >>> we already use pink for the minutes. >> we ran out of blue. >>> okay, and blue is very important to this agency, so, you know. >> i'm learning every day what's important to this agency. >>> interest you go. >> use red for the budget. >>> yes, the budget we don't want to be. my other comment was related to employee conduct. there was an article in yesterday's paper about employee conduct that's inappropriate and that staff is taking that very seriously. i believe that is true. i believe with an agency this big spread over as many counties that we are that it is entirely possible that people occasionally do the wrong thing. but i know that things are taken very seriously in hr and elsewhere within the organization where something is found, it
that increase the cost if it were 100% renewable? >> [speaker not understood]. when it's a dry year for us in the hetchy system, it's typically a dry year for everyone, which means there's upward price pressure in the electric market. so, he yes, i would expect that prices would be higher. yes, we would have to purchase more. we would have to meet whatever our commitment was to our customers in terms of the level of renewables. 100% renewable, we'd need to meet 100% renewable in our purchase plan. we would need to meet the mix requirements as well for, you know, what renewable product consistent with state law. and, so, that would serve as the floor and you could exercise discretion beyond that as to what the mix would be. that would be how you could dial in the pricing that keep it affordable in a high wholesale price year. but it's all those moving parts that we need to be managing under a scenario where we don't have a committed price like the shell project, with the shell approach. >> um-hm. >> yes. >> if i could just go back to slide 5 just for a minute. >> sure. >> can you help me un
's tough to fit it in but it's important to fit it in and it will make us more effective. we did an exercise back in may in preparation for this and developed a pretty detailed concept of operations. we built load plan, timelines, spare parts lists, we really got into the weeds, thinking about the second and third tier effects, so i want my relief to understand that and i want him to know where that plan is so he can pull it right off the shelf if this ever happens and be ready to respond quickly instead of trying to figure this all out when we need to be getting underway. >> i'll boil mine down into just one, and that is i will pass to my relief to continue to support events like this and look for opportunities to continue to learn how we best in the military can integrate with our civilian and federal contemporaries to be prepared for an eventuality that we hope will never come, but we certainly should be prepared for. so the one thing i'm passing on is keep the momentum. >> thank you, all. one other benefit that was cited in the after action review and also was mentioned tod
an institutional perspective at the tactical level in the marine corps. that's an area where we could use some improvement. our forces deployed to the western pacific certainly understand this, and they pass it on among themselves. the forces we deploy from southern california and the east coast that float into theater understand disaster assistance and humantarian response very well. that hasn't quite migrated itself into the institutional arena in terms of forces stationed here in the united states as it would relate to defense support to civil authorities. i think that's primarily -- this is not a primary mission for us. it's something that we do pay attention to, of course, as we deploy overseas. not necessarily forces we have here in the states. we do understand immediate response, rolling out the gate to help our neighbors in an immediate nature, but i think not so much in terms of mobilization and deploying inside our country. so, this is an area where opportunities like san francisco fleet week will allow us for, and i believe at some point really incorporate this in some internal doct
brahas, 20 years old, how we caught him, too, he used a lot of the internet. he was all over youtube, facebook. his girlfriend was big in helping us locate him. she put it on her facebook. you know, i don't know if you guys know this, too, when you take a picture and you post it on your facebook, it gives a little longitude-latitude. that's how we got up to glendale. we're in phoenix, arizona. let's see. here's a little bit about jugs again real quick. he got 4-1/2 years prison time, over $10,000 in damage to the city for clean up. got 6-1/2 years in prison. he did over $15,000 in damageses to the city. how we caught mod the first time, which kind of upset me, is he spray painted a fire station. and i don't know about you guys have good firemen like us, but our firemen like to kick the crap out of people that do things like that. they've helped me a lot. they actually chased this kid down, got him arrested for the criminal damage on the firehouse, but for some unknown reason we didn't get a call out on it. when i get something like that, i know who he is. i put a file stop on him. fo
. today we'll be talking about preventing, treating, and recovering from mental and substance use disorders within the context of the family. joining us in our panel today are frances harding, director, center for substance abuse prevention, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland. dr. nancy young, executive director, children and family futures, irvine, california. erica asselin, family support specialist and medication-assisted treatment advocate, fresh start, square one, holyoke, massachusetts. dr. kim sumner-mayer, senior advisor, phoenix house center on addiction and the family new york, new york. fran, what is the definition of family within our society currently? that's a very good question. family has changed, the definition. we used to think of family as two parents living in a house with two children and probably a pet or two. now, we have a wide variety of families. we have families that are one parent, single parent, being raised by friends, being raised by grandparents, relatives of a
that this is a financial use for signature vest tores, i did look for vig signature invest or and nothing came up with permits and i all looked for chan and nothing came up, with the department of real estate permits or licenses but nothing for financial services. the materials that they handed out if i could have the overhead says that the signature investors inc in oakland, with the business address in boston. and it talks about investment advisory services this is not financial services as defined under the planning code. what they were referring to from the interpretation from the mid 90s and referring to somehow the board of supervisors over turning a zoning administrator interpretation, the board of supervisors does not do that. they don't have the authority do that. the board of appeals hears the appeals of the zoning administrator determinations. if they disagree with a administration they can change the planning code nthis case it was an appeal of cu and disagreed and thought that the zoning administrator and they applied and didn't think that it was appropriate to be considered as a bus
very complex response, and then recognizing for us the supported commander was usaid that normally isn't in the emergency response business. so, it was an educational process of how to move forces and yet support usaid and the role of the country team and port au prince. so, it was very informative there. and to back up when we had the first no fooling hurricane that worked its way up the entire gulf coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all of the governors into a conference call with the president to make sure that all their needs were being met in the advance of a hurricane arrival. so, we really had all of government, from local all the way up to the white house, fully included in that response. but the haiti response was certainly informative in bringing all these disparate entities together to provide unity of effort during a response. >> we need general spiese. >> okay, thanks. i would offer a little bit from an institutional perspective at the tactical level in the marine corps. that's an
. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids reflect and make positive choices by lea
never again to be behind the curve, in fact, if we use it well, we should remain consistently ahead of the curve which is exactly where we want to be. thank you, very much. [ applause ] thank you chancler bishop. i particularly am pleased that you pointed out that we have been talking about science, but increasingly, not only basic science, but translational science, focus on diagnostics and you even see the folks with the white coats around the campus, most recently and i also want to mention that we are bringing global health sciences to mission bay within the next two years. so i would like to introduce mike laret who is leading the next chapter in the history of mission bay the development of the ucsf medical center and the children's hospital at mission bay. mike? >> thank you, sue. late last week first grade girl was admitted to ucsf children's hospital on pernasis with a brain tumor, malignant as it turns out. that girl had section of the tumor but faces a very difficult course and a poor prognosis. that little girl is the reason just 100 yards from here across the street we
and the entitlement actions and the specifics on those. so, the request before you today is for conditional use authorization to allow development on the lot greater than 5,000 square feet, to allow a nonresidential use greater than 2000 square feet, to allow the demolition of a former movie theater, and to allow restaurant use for the type 47 abc lice license. and then the commission would also make recommendations regarding the proposed reclassification of the site from a 40 foot to a 55 foot height limit and the adoption of a special use district or sud for the site. so, the development project involves the demolition of the existing vacant feeder and the construction of a new five story over basement mixed use building containing up to 18 dwelling units, a restaurant measuring approximately 4700 square feet, and up to 27 off-street parking spaces. and as has been described, following demolition of these existing building and prior to the construction of the new building, the site will be utilized for extraction of the tunnel boring equipment associated with the central subway project. a pro
as creating access to the public, using the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, joh
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